Symposium

Title Poster First Author Abstract or summary Type
Brain morphologic changes during the course of schizophrenia Tsutomu Takahashi

Previous MRI studies have demonstrated gross brain morphologic changes, such as altered sulcogyral pattern, at the onset of first-episode schizophrenia, suggesting an early neurodevelopmental disturbance. Recent studies in individuals at ultra high-risk of psychosis (UHR) further supported the neurodevelopmental pathology of schizophrenia. On the other hand, longitudinal MRI studies have demonstrated active progressive brain changes especially in temporal regions during the initial stage of illness, which may represent a pathological process in late neurodevelopment.

Conference Presentations
Factors for Motivational Intervention of Exercise in Patients with Psychosis Edwin H. M. Lee

BackgroundPhysical activity has many well-known benefits including reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, hypertension, cancers and early death. Despite the fact that regular physical activity helps to improve functioning and reduce symptoms, the prevalence of physical activity remains low due to multiple biopsychosocial factors.

Conference Presentations
SHAPE (Supporting Health And Promoting Exercise) Project for Young People with Psychosis Jo Smith

Physical health problems are common in young people with psychosis who experience poor health and a significant reduction in life expectancy. This is mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease (CVD), underpinned by metabolic disorders like diabetes, and tobacco smoking. Moreover, the mortality gap compared to non-psychotic peers is widening. Yet in many UK EI services, physical health monitoring is not systematic and care plans fail to routinely address the physical health risks for young people with psychosis.

Conference Presentations
Early Lifestyle Intervention Attenuates Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain In First Episode Psychosis Jackie Curtis

Youth with first episode psychosis (FEP) receiving antipsychotic (AP) medications are at risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome. AP initiation induces rapid deterioration in metabolic health, with up to 77% experiencing clinically significant (>7%) weight-gain within 12 months(1,2). We aimed to determine whether a multidisciplinary, 12-week intervention could attenuate weight gain.

Conference Presentations
Characterizing and Operationalizing Clinical High-Risk for Bipolar Disorder: Description and Validation of The Bipolar Prodrome Symptom Interview and Scale-Prospective (BPSS-P) in a Psychiatric Sample and Healthy Controls Taishiro Kishimoto

Aims: To 1) summarize the current terminology, models and emerging criteria for risk for bipolar disorder (BD), and 2) present data on the validation of the first specific bipolar prodrome interview/rating scale.Methods: 1) Review of existing terminology, models and operational criteria for individuals considered at-risk for BD; 2) Interview study investigating the psychometric characteristics of the Bipolar Prodrome Symptom Interview and Scale-Prospective (BPSS-P), the first dedicated bipolar at-risk interview/rating scale.

Conference Presentations
Does A Prodrome Exist in Bipolar Disorder? Christoph U Correll

Background: Despite therapeutic advances, bipolar disorder (BD) remains one of the most debilitating psychiatric disorders. Unfortunately, lacking knowledge about the underlying pathophysiology limit early identification and indicated prevention efforts. Therefore, early characterization of the prodromal (subsyndromal) stages of BD has attracted increasing attention, especially in youth, given the early age of first BD symptom onset.

Conference Presentations
Developing Strategies to Reduce DUP in the Age of Social Media and the Internet John M Kane

Background:Despite the severity of first episode of psychosis (FEP), the duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) averages 2 years, preceded by another 2 years of prodromal symptoms. Longer DUP independently predicts readmissions, greater symptom severity and poor quality of life. Although FEP individuals are young and use social media and the internet widely, these novel technologies have been leveraged insufficiently to reduce DUP.

Conference Presentations
Screening for early psychosis and risk for psychosis Rachel Loewy

Background: Self-report screening for psychosis and psychotic-like symptoms is an important tool used by early detection efforts to reduce the duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and to identify youth experiencing clinical high risk for psychosis (CHR). Methods: We will describe a series of validation studies of the Prodromal Questionnaire (PQ) and two brief versions of the measure, tested in a variety of settings in multiple languages and countries: early psychosis clinics, general mental health clinics, university courses, and in a prison population.

Conference Presentations
Phenomenology of psychotic symptoms in borderline personality disorder versus schizophrenia spectrum or affective psychotic disorders: a systematic review Felix-Antoine Berube

OBJECTIVES: There is currently no consensus regarding the phenomenology and severity of hallucinations and other psychotic phenomena associated with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). This review investigates the quality, duration, functional impact, distress related to psychotic symptoms occurring in the context of BPD compared with psychotic symptoms occurring in the context of schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD) or affective psychotic disorders. It also examines the relations of these symptoms to life-events and dissociative symptoms.

Conference Presentations
A comparison of psychotic symptoms in youth with borderline personality disorder or first-episode psychosis. Andrew Chanen

Objective: To characterise the phenomenology, intensity and functional impact of psychotic experiences in first-presentation BPD patients and to compare these experiences with those from a first episode psychosis (FEP) sample. Methods: A cross-sectional interview was conducted that included the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE-_42) scores with four groups of patients: BPD + FEP (n=17), FEP (n=16), BPD (n=34), and clinical controls (n=49).

Conference Presentations

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