Oral

Title Poster First Author Abstract or summary Type
Interventions to prevent suicidal behaviour in individuals with psychotic disorder Merete Nordentoft

Introduction: Suicide rates among people with psychotic disorders are 20 fold higher than among people in the general population. Methods and results: Meta analyses of suicide risk in schizophrenia are mentioned and risk factors for suicide in schizophrenia are reviewed. Danish population registers were used to determine a long term cumulated risk of suicide of four percent for women and six percent for men. Two high risk periods for suicide were identified: shortly after admission and shortly after discharge.

Conference Presentations
Cost and Effect of Early Intervention on admission in First Episode Psychosis Caragh Behan

Early intervention in psychosis (EIP) is an accepted policy internationally. It is necessary to evaluate whether policies are applicable within a local context. In Ireland in 2012 the National Clinical Programme Plan identified EIP as one of three priorities for development. Concurrently the health budget has been reduced, highlighting the need for economic evaluation of all new initiatives. Admission is an outcome however it is also a large proportion of the direct cost.

Conference Presentations
Calgary Fidelity Scale for First Episode Psychosis Services (CFEPS) Donald Addington

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a fidelity scale to assess the degree of implementation of essential evidence-based components for First Episode Psychosis Services (FEPS). Methods: We used a 3 stage knowledge synthesis process: a systematic review of the literature in order to identify service components; a DELPHI consensus-building technique with an international panel of experts; and a construction and pilot testing phase. Results: The literature review identified 1,020 citations, from which 280 peer reviewed articles met criteria for relevance.

Conference Presentations
Overactivation of Emotional Brain Systems Predicts Severity of Positive Symptoms and Global Functioning in Prodromal and First-Episode Psychosis Gemma Modinos

Background: Overactivation of corticolimbic brain areas to irrelevant or non-emotional stimuli has been proposed as a key pathogenic process in schizophrenia, leading to the increased subjective emotionality, and the development of psychotic symptoms and functional impairments that are characteristic of the disorder. Neural and subjective responses to neutral stimuli have not been examined in groups at risk, and their impact on levels of psychotic symptoms and global functioning is unknown.

Conference Presentations
NorthBEAT: Narrative Interviews to Explore the Needs of Youth in Remote/Northern Canada Chiachen Cheng

Objectives: While research in early psychosis intervention (EPI) has made significant contributions to care, it may not extrapolate well to northern or rural service environments. In Northern Ontario (a central-province in Canada with an expansive geography with many Aboriginal communities), services struggle to understand unique presentations and discrepancies.

Conference Presentations
Beyond early intervention & woodshedding: Using narrative to provide a new context for applying a recovery paradigm after the early phase of psychosis Alan Rosen

This presentation considers how early intervention in psychosis can support a recovery paradigm. Methods: Significant numbers of those developing a first episode of psychosis are on a path to a persisting and potentially life long condition. Constituting the schizophrenia spectrum disorders, such conditions demand the particular qualities and attitudes inherent within recovery-based practice.

Conference Presentations
Womens Experiences of First Episode Psychosis: From Individual Narratives to Gender-Appropriate Services Anna Lavis

It is widely recognised that there are gender differences in the clinical presentation of psychotic disorders, in terms of illness onset, symptomatology and social functioning. Women often develop a first episode of psychosis (FEP) later and their illness experiences may therefore be embedded in different social contexts to those of men. Yet, to date little research has asked whether these variations are mirrored by, or give rise to, gender differences in individuals subjective experiences of psychosis or its effects on their day-to-day lives.

Conference Presentations
Seeing the Doc at 11am, cooking group at midday, and hitting the gym at 2pm. Patient and staff perspectives of an embedded lifestyle intervention within an early psychosis programme Andrew Watkins

Keeping the Body In Mind (KBIM) is an intensive 12-week, strength-based multidisciplinary lifestyle intervention delivered at the initiation of anti-psychotic treatment for young people experiencing first episode psychosis. The KBIM program comprised dietitian and exercise physiology interventions, in addition to individualised health coaching delivered by a clinical nurse consultant and youth peer support workers to maximize participation through a recovery-oriented approach.

Conference Presentations
Anti-Psychotics as 'a worthwhile gamble? Engaging with the Views of Service Users with First Episode Psychosis on Physical Health and Healthcare Anna Lavis

Background: It is recognised that the physical health of individuals with severe mental illness is often poorer than that of individuals without. This has recently engendered interventions aimed at attenuating, in particular, long-term effects on service users physical health attributable to anti-psychotic medications. However, researchers and policy makers have arguably made this leap from poorer health outcomes to service delivery mechanisms with little engagement with service users own views of their physical health and healthcare.

Conference Presentations
What is helpful about psychotic experiences? Mike Jackson

It has been hypothesised that psychotic experience in the normal population is 'self-limiting' and of 'good outcome'. This study aimed firstly to explore whether and how such experiences are felt to be helpful in the lives of those who report them as frequent events ('Uniques'); and secondly, how far these benefits are present in patients with psychotic disorders and 'Need for Care'(NFCs). In depth interviews were conducted with 140 participants as part of a larger study.

Conference Presentations

Pages