Oral

Title Poster First Author Abstract or summary Type
The relationship between motivation, social anxiety, and social functioning in schizophrenia. Miki Tobe

Purpose To investigate differences in motivation between patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls using the General Causality of Orientation Scale (GCOS) and to reveal the relationships between motivation, social anxiety, psychiatric symptoms, and social functioning in the patients. Methods Twenty two outpatients (12 men; mean age 31.7 years) and 22 controls (12 men; mean age 33.0 years) were recruited. The GCOS was used to evaluate the strength of three different orientations of motivation (Autonomy: A; Controlled: C; Impersonal: I).

Conference Presentations
Adapting Individual Placement and Support to Education for Young People with Severe Mental Illness Eoin Killackey

Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of adapting Individual Placement and Support (IPS) to education for young people presenting to a tertiary mental health service who wished to re-engage with their education. Methods: The study was an uncontrolled trial. 20 young people with severe mental illness were recruited and worked with an Educational Specialist providing adapted IPS for education (IPSed). Demographic, educational and symptom measures were collected at baseline. Educational outcome was collected at the end of the 6-month intervention.

Conference Presentations
Individual Placement and Support (IPS) supplemented with cognitive remediation and work related social skills training in Denmark: A Randomized Clinical Trial Thomas Nordahl Christensen

Background: Individual Placement and Support (IPS) is established as the most effective vocational intervention in order to obtain competitive employment for people with severe mental illness. However, no IPS studies have been conducted in Denmark, which is characterized by having a specialized labor market with a high minimum wage and few entry-level jobs. Further, long-term job retention and economic self-sufficiency have not yet been clearly demonstrated.

Conference Presentations
Pre-empting social damage through early detection: Long-term negative symptom and vocational function levels Wenche ten Velden Hegelstad

Background: Poor vocational outcome remains a challenge in first episode psychosis (FEP): Only 13-43% of patients have any employment. In the Scandinavian TIPS study, early detection and negative symptoms predicted long-term recovery, of which full time paid employment was part. Little is known about associations over time between negative symptoms, early detection, and employment. Objective: To test the hypothesis that early detection improves vocational outcome through sustained lower levels of negative symptoms, thus improving patients ability to function.

Conference Presentations
Non-remission of positive symptoms and functional recovery in first-episode psychosis Swapna Verma

Objective: The aim of the study was to examine the rates and significant predictors of non-remission of positive symptoms in FEP and to evaluate the impact of non-remission on functional recovery. Methods: All consecutive patients with FEP presenting to the Singapore Early Psychosis Intervention Programme (EPIP) from 2001 to 2008 were recruited for the study. We used a priori criteria to define non-remission i.e.

Conference Presentations
We are here for the long haul: Novel Social Media and Mobile Technologies for Long-term recovery in First Episode Psychosis (The Horyzons project) Mario Alvarez-Jimenez

Background: Early intervention services have demonstrated improved outcomes in first episode psychosis (FEP); however, recent evidence shows that treatment benefits may not be sustainable over time. Objectives: The aim of this study is to answer the important question of whether the clinical benefits of specialised FEP programmes can be extended into long-term improvements through the use of a world-first, online psychosocial intervention.

Conference Presentations
A randomised clinical trial of a novel Audio-Visual Assisted Therapy Aid for Refractory auditory hallucinations (AVATAR therapy) Thomas Ward

Background: AVATAR therapy is a novel approach to working with distressing voices, which focuses on the relationship between voice-hearer and their voice. Specially developed computer technology enables each person to create an avatar of the entity (human or non-human) that they believe is talking to them. The person then dialogues with the 'avatar, which is controlled by the therapist to reflect a) verbatim voice content b) the persons understanding of their voice. During early stages the person asserts themselves over the avatar.

Conference Presentations
Phase-specific cognitive remediation in the early course of schizophrenia Takahiro Nemoto

Introduction: Although there is strong evidence that cognitive remediation is effective in chronic schizophrenia, there is little evidence about its efficacy in the early course of schizophrenia. The aims of this study were to demonstrate the usefulness of cognitive remediation and its effective methods in patients with early schizophrenia. Methods: Ninety-four outpatients (50 men, 44 women) with one of three conditions (schizophrenia in the critical period (within 5 years of the onset), chronic schizophrenia, or at-risk mental state for psychosis) were recruited.

Conference Presentations
Longer-term follow-up in the Vienna omega-3 psychosis prevention trial G. Paul Amminger

Background: We have shown that a 12-week intervention with long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) reduced the risk of progression to psychotic disorder in young people with subthreshold psychotic states for a 12-month period (Amminger et al., 2010, Arch Gen Psychiatry). Now we have completed a longer-term follow-up of this trial to determine the longer-term efficacy of omega-3-PUFAs in individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis. Methods: Randomized, double-blind trial of 1.2g/day omega-3 PUFAs or placebo in 81 UHR individuals.

Conference Presentations
Life after Early Intervention for Psychosis Services –What happens once the doors close? Linda Everard

Background: Little is known about patients service trajectories once discharged from high intensity Early Intervention teams to lower intensity services such as Community Mental Health Teams (CMHTs) or GPs. We sought to investigate where clients are discharged to, whether they remain free from mental health service input and how many bounce between primary and secondary care 2 years post EIS. Method: The authors studied 1027 young adults with first episode psychosis.

Conference Presentations

Pages