Oral

Title Poster First Author Abstract or summary Type
History of offending behavior in first episode psychosis patients: a marker of specific clinical needs and a call for early detection strategies among young offenders. Philippe Conus

Objectives: Previous literature suggests that first episode psychosis (FEP) patients with a history of offending behavior (HOB) have specific clinical needs. The aims of this study were to assess: (1) the prevalence of HOB in a representative sample of FEP; (2) the premorbid and baseline characteristics of patients with HOB, and (3) the potential differences in short-term outcome of such patients when compared to patients without HOB. Method: The Early Psychosis Prevention and Intervention Centre (EPPIC) admitted 786 FEP patients between 1998 and 2000.

Conference Presentations
Neighbourhood characteristics and the incidence of first episode psychosis (FEP) and duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) Brian O'Donoghue

Background: The incidence of psychotic disorders varies between geographical areas and it is hypothesized that neighbourhood level factors such as social deprivation, fragmentation and population density may influence this variation. The aims of this study are to determine whether the incidence of FEP and the DUP are associated with the level of social deprivation, fragmentation and population density at the neighbourhood level. Methods: All individuals with a FEP from a geographical defined catchment area assessed over a five year period between 2006 and 2011 were included.

Conference Presentations
Childhood Neurodevelopmental Disorders, IQ and Subsequent Risk of Psychotic Experiences in the ALSPAC Birth Cohort Golam Khandaker

Background: Schizophrenia has a neurodevelopmental component to its origin, and may share overlapping pathogenic mechanisms with childhood neurodevelopmental disorders (ND). Yet longitudinal studies of psychotic outcomes among individuals with ND are limited. We report a population-based prospective study of six common childhood ND, subsequent neurocognitive performance and the risk of psychotic experiences (PE) in early-adolescence. Methods: PE were assessed by semi-structured interviews at age 13 years. IQ and working memory were measured between ages 9 and 11 years.

Conference Presentations
Public health significance of bipolar disorder: implications for early intervention and prevention Philippe Conus

Objectives: Early intervention and preventive strategies have become major targets of research and service development in psychiatry over the last few years. Compared to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder (BD) has however received limited attention in this regard. In a review of the available literature, we explored the public health significance of BD and the extent to which this may justify the development of early intervention strategies for this disorder. Methods: The main computerized psychiatric literature databases were accessed.

Conference Presentations
Economic evaluation of Early Intervention in Psychosis in comparison to Treatment as Usual Caragh Behan

Early intervention in psychosis (EIP) is an accepted policy internationally. It is important to evaluate whether policies are applicable within a local context. The aim of this study is to perform an economic evaluation of an EIP service in comparison to treatment as usual (TAU).

Conference Presentations
Neuroanatomy of Comorbid Affective Disorders in the Ultra-High Risk of Psychosis State Gemma Modinos

Background: Symptoms of depression and anxiety are often the primary complaint of the Ultra-High Risk of psychosis (UHR) patient rather than attenuated psychotic symptoms, with a significant impact on psychosocial and emotional functioning. Reasons for the high frequency of affective disorders such as depression and anxiety in people at UHR are uncertain.

Conference Presentations
Delays to Diagnosis and Treatment of Bipolar Disorder: the UK experience Matthew Taylor

It is common for people with bipolar disorder to experience delays of several years to diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Retrospective studies often report more than ten years between the onset of illness and correct diagnosis being made. Similarly delays of many years before initiation of appropriate medication are described. Growing evidence indicates delayed diagnosis and treatment of bipolar disorder are associated with poorer long term outcomes. Understanding these delays better is key to devising appropriate strategies to remediate them.

Conference Presentations
Early Intervention for Bipolar Disorder: The Role of Psychological Interventions Craig A Macneil

For the majority of people who develop bipolar disorder, its onset occurs in late adolescence or early adulthood, a crucial phase in our developmental trajectory. This paper will describe some of the significant challenges and opportunities relating to undertaking psychological interventions with a young bipolar population who are early in the course of the disorder. It will focus particularly on the challenges of engagement and development of insight, while recognising the considerable potential for positive outcomes with this group.

Conference Presentations
Pharmacological interventions in early bipolar disorder Matthew J Taylor

Medications prescribed in early bipolar overlap with those commonly employed in early intervention for non-affective psychosis. This talk will review the latest evidence for the most widely employed pharmacological agents in early bipolar disorder including new analyses incorporating the latest data from randomised controlled trials. Of particular interest is the now clear evidence that agents differ substantially in their relative effects on depressive and manic episodes, and this should allow more rational choice of agents particularly for relapse prevention

Conference Presentations
Emerging Mood and Anxiety Disorders: Lost in Transition Swaran P Singh

Background: Many adolescents with mental health problems experience transition of care from child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) to adult mental health services (AMHS). As part of the multisite TRACK study we evaluated the process, outcomes and user and carer experience of transition from CAMHS to AMHS in six large mental health Trusts in England. Method: We identified a cohort of service users (n=154) crossing the CAMHS/AMHS boundary over one year and tracked their transition journey.

Conference Presentations

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