Oral

Title Poster First Author Abstract or summary Type
Studying Heart Arrhythmias in Relation to Psychosis (SHARP). Increased prevalence of suspect Brugada ECG in recent onset schizophrenia. Arjen Sutterland

Introduction: Schizophrenia is associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death, traditionally attributed to prolonged QTc interval and cardiovascular risk factors such as metabolic syndrome. However, defective ion channels are also implicated in schizophrenia. This applies as well for Brugada syndrome (BrS), a rare hereditary cardiac disorder associated with an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmias, which can been provoked by various drugs, including psychotropic.

Conference Presentations
Certain cannabis compounds make cannabis less harmful. Amir Englund

It is well established that heavy long-term cannabis use, particularly which starts at a young age, significantly increases the risk of cognitive impairment, psychosis, as well as hastens the onset of psychosis. However, cannabis consists of over 85 cannabis specific compounds known as cannabinoids, each of which with difference pharmacological effects. ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main cannabinoid and also responsible for the negative effects of cannabis when taken in high doses.

Conference Presentations
Cannabis use as a predictor for relapse in First Episode Psychosis: A three-year follow up study Tabea Schoeler

Background. The emergence of a relapse following a first episode psychosis (FEP) is common in patients suffering from the disorder. Although cannabis represents one potential factor that predicts relapse, conclusions from current findings are limited given the cross-sectional nature of study designs and the inclusion of patients that are at different stages of their illness. Methods. Ninety-five FEP participants presenting to an inner city service in London were assessed at follow-up.

Conference Presentations
Appraisals of experimental analogues of psychotic symptoms in individuals with psychotic experiences with and without a 'need for care Emmanuelle Peters

Background: People displaying persistent psychotic experiences without a need-for-care in the general population are an ideal group to investigate to differentiate those factors that are linked to distress and dysfunction from those that are merely associated with benign anomalous experiences. Cognitive models of psychosis propose that 'appraisals are key to determining the transition from anomalous experience to psychotic symptom.

Conference Presentations
Remembering daily cognitive functioning in subjects at ultra-high risk for psychosis: a cross-sectional study on everyday manifestations of cognitive deficits in an ultra-high risk cohort Lasse Randers

Background and purpose: The neurocognitive impairments in subjects at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis are well-established, but there is a profound paucity of ecologically valid data on daily cognitive functioning in this population. The relationship between everyday cognitive functioning and clinical symptomatology as well as the relationship between everyday cognitive functioning and real-life functioning are not well understood. There is an urgent need to investigate this area since it may potentially contribute to elucidating cognitive characteristics of UHR subjects.

Conference Presentations
Early intervention for ultra-high risk youth in Japan: clinical practice in three leading centres Masahiro Katsura

Background: Clinical observations of at-risk mental state (ARMS), including transition rates to psychosis, have largely emerged from research on Western populations. In Japan, several research centres provide clinical services for ARMS; however, studies at each site have involved small samples, limiting their statistical power. Thus, we combined samples from three leading centres to produce large-scale multi-centre datasets of Japanese observations. Methods: Clinical information on ARMS samples were gathered from specialised services for ARMS from Toho, Tohoku, and Toyama Universities.

Conference Presentations
Psychotic-like experiences and academic achievement: Implications for detecting prodromal symptoms Megan Walberg

Psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) and cognitive deficits in adolescence index a risk for psychosis. The relationship between PLEs and cognitive impairments, which may be indexed by academic underachievement, is not fully understood. This study aimed to explore both the quantitative and qualitative nature of this relationship. Drawing upon a British cohort study (N= 1247) of adolescents (14 years at baseline), a latent class analysis was used to assign participants to one of four groups based on national exams scores in English and Mathematics at ages 11, 14, and 15 years.

Conference Presentations
Neurocognitive Functioning for Youth at Clinical High Risk of Developing Psychosis in NAPLS-2 Larry J. Seidman

Background: Neurocognitive impairment is common in youth at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis. However, the roles of medications and age have not been systematically addressed. We examined neurocognition in CHR individuals who transitioned to psychosis (CHR-T, n=41) vs. those who didnt (CHR-NT, n=286), based on the first half of the NAPLS-2 study. Methods: The sample consisted of baseline testing from 360 CHR individuals (n=327 tested) and 180 healthy controls (HC, n=177 tested), who had reached the 24 month follow-up.

Conference Presentations
Startle Latency improves Positive Predictive Power for Psychotic Conversion in Clinical High Risk Subjects: Findings from the North American Prodromal Longitudinal Study (NAPLS) Kristin Cadenhead

Background: The NAPLS Consortium investigates risk, prediction and mechanism of psychosis in individuals at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis. Methods: 506 CHR subjects were assessed with the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes (SIPS) and the startle paradigm, a candidate biomarker for psychosis risk. All subjects received clinical follow-up for up to 3.5 years and were classified as having progressed to psychosis (N=47) or not (N=459).

Conference Presentations
Serum IL-6 and CRP in Childhood as Predictors of Psychosis and Depression in Young Adult Life Golam Khandaker

Introduction: Cytokine mediated communication between the immune system and the brain has been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychosis and depression. Meta-analyses of cross-sectional studies suggest increased serum interleukin (IL) 6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) in first episode psychosis, acute psychotic relapse, and depression; however, longitudinal studies are scarce. We predicted that higher levels of IL-6 and CRP in childhood would be associated with future risks of psychosis and depression.

Conference Presentations

Pages