IEPA 2014

Title Poster First Author Abstract or summary Type
Neurobiological Correlates of Basic Self-Disturbances in subjects at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis Ilaria Bonoldi

Basic self-disturbances (BSD), (anomalies of the pre-reflective sense of first-person perspective), are core features of the schizophrenic spectrum disorders and distinctive clinical characteristics of subjects at Clinical High Risk for psychosis (HR). However their neurobiological correlates remain unknown, undermining their validity as clinical construct.

Conference Presentations
Jumping to Conclusion and striatal dysfunctions: An early feature in the course of psychosis? Franziska Rausch

Background: Schizophrenia patients display deficits in monitoring and controlling their own thoughts. One aspect of these metacognitive impairments is a tendency to hasty decision-making during probabilistic reasoning – the Jumping To Conclusion-bias (JTC). In a recent fMRI study we found reduced activations in the right ventral striatum (VS) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to be associated with decision-making in schizophrenia patients. It is unclear, whether these functional alterations already occur in the at-risk mental state (ARMS).

Conference Presentations
Overactivation of Emotional Brain Systems Predicts Severity of Positive Symptoms and Global Functioning in Prodromal and First-Episode Psychosis Gemma Modinos

Background: Overactivation of corticolimbic brain areas to irrelevant or non-emotional stimuli has been proposed as a key pathogenic process in schizophrenia, leading to the increased subjective emotionality, and the development of psychotic symptoms and functional impairments that are characteristic of the disorder. Neural and subjective responses to neutral stimuli have not been examined in groups at risk, and their impact on levels of psychotic symptoms and global functioning is unknown.

Conference Presentations
Prefrontal cortex involvement during emotion regulation in subjects at clinical risk for psychosis Andre Aleman

Introduction: Emotion regulation has been shown to be deficient in schizophrenia and this correlates with reduced activation of prefrontal regions during reappraisal of emotional information. To investigate whether such emotion dysregulation might precede psychotic disorder we studed this in individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR) for developing psychosis. Methods: Using fMRI, we scanned 16 UHR subjects and 16 matched healthy controls while performing an emotion regulation task.

Conference Presentations
Longitudinal relationship between the change in corpus callosum (CC) volume and the changes in the sub-threshold psychotic symptoms in at risk mental state (ARMS) Naoyuki Katagiri

Introduction: There are many evidences of the relationship between morphological abnormality of corpus callosum (CC) and psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia. Whether these relationships predate the onset of psychotic symptoms or developed over the course of the illness progressively remains unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the changes in CC volume during 1-year follow-up period associate with the changes in the sub-threshold psychotic symptoms of ARMS group. Method: Sixteen healthy controls and 41 ARMS subjects were recruited. MRI was performed for all participants.

Conference Presentations
Negative symptoms in the at-risk mental state - association with transition to psychosis and functional outcome Stephen Wood

The at-risk mental state (ARMS) is generally defined by the presence of psychotic symptoms that do not meet the threshold for frank psychotic disorder, because they are attenuated in severity and/or duration. Furthermore, the transition to psychosis is determined on the basis of worsening in these same positive psychotic symptoms. The nature and course of negative symptoms in ARMS individuals is not commonly reported, and no study to date has examined the trajectory of this dimension.

Conference Presentations
The Effect of a Multi-Modal, 12-week Healthy Lifestyle, Grocery Shopping and Walking group Intervention With and Without Switch to Ziprasidone on Metabolic Parameters in a Canadian First Episode Psychosis Population Sharman Robertson

Individuals with psychotic spectrum illnesses are intrinsically vulnerable to central obesity, insulin insensitivity, metabolic syndrome, type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Higher rates of central obesity and abnormal serum glucose/lipids may exist prior to starting antipsychotic medication. Multiple risk factors have been identified: positive, negative and cognitive symptoms of psychosis, poverty, stigma, metabolically active medications, and poor diet.

Conference Presentations
Ten-year follow-up of the Opus trial for first-episode psychosis Carsten Hjorthøj

IntroductionLong-term follow-ups of first-episode psychosis trial cohorts provide unique opportunities for examining course of illness and long-term treatment effects.Methods547 participants with a recent F2 diagnosis were recruited and randomized to either Opus early intervention or standard treatment for two years. The 10-year follow-up rate was 70 % of those living in Denmark.Results368 were assessed at 10 years, with a recovery rate of 58 (15.8 %). 61.3 % had remission of psychotic symptoms, 47.0 % had remission of negative symptoms, and 37.4 % had remission of both.

Conference Presentations
Trajectories of Negative Symptoms Following a First Episode of Psychosis and Implications for Social and Functional Recovery Jo Hodgekins

Negative symptoms are not a stable trait but are subject to significant fluctuations over time. Individuals vary in the stability of their negative symptoms and those with persistently elevated negative symptoms are at highest risk of poor long term outcome. Research investigating individual trajectories of negative symptoms early in the course of non-affective psychosis is limited and little is understood about the longitudinal interplay of negative symptoms and social recovery.

Conference Presentations
Negative psychotic symptoms and impaired role functioning in the at-risk mental state: a latent class cluster analysis study Lucia Valmaggia

Background. Individual symptom scores at baseline do not predict the course and outcome of the at risk mental state.Method. Latent class cluster analysis was applied to investigate data from 318 individuals with an at risk mental state for psychosis. The score on the Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental States (CAARMS) wasused to explore the number, size and symptom profiles of latent classes.Results.

Conference Presentations

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