IEPA 2014

Title Poster First Author Abstract or summary Type
Screening for emerging mental health problems in prison to improve treatment. Lucia Valmaggia

Background Similar to many Western countries, the prison population in the UK is currently at its highest ever (almost 84,000, all but 4000 are male), and there has been an acknowledgment both in recent policy initiatives that addressing the mental health needs of those who come into contact with the Criminal Justice System is fundamental to reducing the prison population. However, limited information is available upon reception into prison to distinguish between those who need mental health interventions and those who do not.

Conference Presentations
Appraisals of experimental analogues of psychotic symptoms in individuals with psychotic experiences with and without a 'need for care Emmanuelle Peters

Background: People displaying persistent psychotic experiences without a need-for-care in the general population are an ideal group to investigate to differentiate those factors that are linked to distress and dysfunction from those that are merely associated with benign anomalous experiences. Cognitive models of psychosis propose that 'appraisals are key to determining the transition from anomalous experience to psychotic symptom.

Conference Presentations
Individual Placement and Support (IPS) supplemented with cognitive remediation and work related social skills training in Denmark: A Randomized Clinical Trial Thomas Nordahl Christensen

Background: Individual Placement and Support (IPS) is established as the most effective vocational intervention in order to obtain competitive employment for people with severe mental illness. However, no IPS studies have been conducted in Denmark, which is characterized by having a specialized labor market with a high minimum wage and few entry-level jobs. Further, long-term job retention and economic self-sufficiency have not yet been clearly demonstrated.

Conference Presentations
Adapting Individual Placement and Support to Education for Young People with Severe Mental Illness Eoin Killackey

Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of adapting Individual Placement and Support (IPS) to education for young people presenting to a tertiary mental health service who wished to re-engage with their education. Methods: The study was an uncontrolled trial. 20 young people with severe mental illness were recruited and worked with an Educational Specialist providing adapted IPS for education (IPSed). Demographic, educational and symptom measures were collected at baseline. Educational outcome was collected at the end of the 6-month intervention.

Conference Presentations
The relationship between motivation, social anxiety, and social functioning in schizophrenia. Miki Tobe

Purpose To investigate differences in motivation between patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls using the General Causality of Orientation Scale (GCOS) and to reveal the relationships between motivation, social anxiety, psychiatric symptoms, and social functioning in the patients. Methods Twenty two outpatients (12 men; mean age 31.7 years) and 22 controls (12 men; mean age 33.0 years) were recruited. The GCOS was used to evaluate the strength of three different orientations of motivation (Autonomy: A; Controlled: C; Impersonal: I).

Conference Presentations
Challenges to Recovery Following Early Psychosis: Implications of Recovery Rate and Timing W Joy Maddigan

The early psychosis movement is founded on an indicated prevention framework that has early illness identification and timely recovery as its driving force. This study advances understanding of recovery by examining the recovery status of individuals who participated in a three-year early psychosis program. This prospective cohort study of 260 individuals is one strand of a mixed methods investigation that explored recovery outcomes and experiences over a nine-year period (2001-2009). Two operational measures were used to explore the rate and timing of recovery within the cohort:1.

Conference Presentations
Childhood sleep disturbance and risk of psychotic experiences at 18 in a large UK birth cohort Andrew Thompson

Introduction: Sleep disturbances are commonly reported in the psychosis prodrome but rarely explored in relation to psychotic experiences or as a risk indicator for these experiences. We investigated the relationship between specific early sleep disturbances in childhood, specific parasomnias (nightmares, night terrors and sleepwalking) and later adolescent psychotic experiences in a birth cohort. Methods: The data was from a large UK birth cohort study (Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children - ALSPAC).

Conference Presentations
Serum IL-6 and CRP in Childhood as Predictors of Psychosis and Depression in Young Adult Life Golam Khandaker

Introduction: Cytokine mediated communication between the immune system and the brain has been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychosis and depression. Meta-analyses of cross-sectional studies suggest increased serum interleukin (IL) 6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) in first episode psychosis, acute psychotic relapse, and depression; however, longitudinal studies are scarce. We predicted that higher levels of IL-6 and CRP in childhood would be associated with future risks of psychosis and depression.

Conference Presentations
Startle Latency improves Positive Predictive Power for Psychotic Conversion in Clinical High Risk Subjects: Findings from the North American Prodromal Longitudinal Study (NAPLS) Kristin Cadenhead

Background: The NAPLS Consortium investigates risk, prediction and mechanism of psychosis in individuals at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis. Methods: 506 CHR subjects were assessed with the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes (SIPS) and the startle paradigm, a candidate biomarker for psychosis risk. All subjects received clinical follow-up for up to 3.5 years and were classified as having progressed to psychosis (N=47) or not (N=459).

Conference Presentations
Remembering daily cognitive functioning in subjects at ultra-high risk for psychosis: a cross-sectional study on everyday manifestations of cognitive deficits in an ultra-high risk cohort Lasse Randers

Background and purpose: The neurocognitive impairments in subjects at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis are well-established, but there is a profound paucity of ecologically valid data on daily cognitive functioning in this population. The relationship between everyday cognitive functioning and clinical symptomatology as well as the relationship between everyday cognitive functioning and real-life functioning are not well understood. There is an urgent need to investigate this area since it may potentially contribute to elucidating cognitive characteristics of UHR subjects.

Conference Presentations

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